Tag Archives: responsibility

Creative (and Educational) Ways to Celebrate the World Cup with Your Kids

8 Jul

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Have you been watching the 2014 World Cup with your kids? Did your family collectively hold its breath over Tim Howard’s iconic saves and groan in unison over Belgium’s hard-fought win? We know we did. Although the United States is no longer playing, every country puts forth skill and heart when they step onto the playing field.

Beyond just entertainment, soccer provides an excellent opportunity for young children to learn key educational concepts and develop their gross motor skills. Here are some quick ideas you can share with your kids – inspired by the game of “football” -and a few toys that will encourage them to get their FIFA on.

Lessons from Soccer

Pace

The great thing about soccer is that everyone learns it at their own pace. When children hit the field, they begin at varying skill levels. Just because a child can’t juggle as many times as their peer does not mean that they are a poor player. Understanding that every child learns at their own rate is an important concept that can be applied in the classroom. Whether it’s maintaining ball control or understanding new vocabulary, children can come to embrace different paces of learning and even help peers improve in areas they have already mastered.

Responsibility

Whether you are a center midfielder or a sweeper, every soccer position comes with different responsibilities. Be sure to point these out as you are watching the World Cup with your child. No two roles are the same and each comes with different responsibilities. Every player is relied on by his or her teammates and if they do not perform the tasks asked of them, it affects the whole team. Encouraging children to understand the importance of responsibility will help them better appreciate it in the classroom.

Teamwork

Finally, soccer is a great way to teach cooperative play. A team never relies on one person, even if that player is Messi! It takes the combined effort of the goalkeeper, defense, and offense to put balls into the back of the net. Show children how to pass together and use communication to let each other know when they are open to score! Be sure to stress that effective communication is the best way to achieve a goal together.

-Now that your child has learned a few soccer lessons, give him or her the chance to play! Whether you need goalssoccer balls, or soccer books, we have the toys to get you started!

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Want a whole new way to play soccer? Check out our Light-Up Air Power Soccer Disk, perfect for indoor play! The soccer disk hovers on a cushion of air, allowing it to be used on any indoor or outdoor surface! The disk is lit up with LEDs, so that it can be used day or night. The disk provides a great alternative to outdoor play.

We hope you enjoyed these soccer lessons and toys! We hope you’re getting excited for the upcoming match between Brazil and Germany. Happy World Cup watching!

Gardening: A Growing Process for Children

15 Apr

Spring is a great time to not only get outdoors and enjoy some nice weather, but to teach your kids what it means to go green. There are so many takeaways that can be gained from gardening, including developmental growth, fine motor skills through dealing with small seeds, and gross motor skills as they water their plants and dig. To show you all of the potential gardening presents for your preschooler, we’ve decided to share some key takeaways and learning lessons that will help your child become a balanced learner.

Key concepts:

-Plants grow from seeds

-Food we eat at meal times comes from plants that we grow from seeds

-Water, soil and sunlight are all needed to help a seed grow

A few tasks to get you started:

  • Prepare the garden: this is the time when you have to prepare your gardening area for planting. You can have kids help you with everything from clearing away leaves, to pulling weeds, to washing out plastic pots for sowing.
  • Make sure your early crops are sown directly into the soil: this includes making sure that plants that need to get an early start are planted outside: can include carrots, spring onions, peas, lettuce, red cabbage, radishes, etc.
  • Sow tender crops: these crops can be grow by windowsills inside your home. They can include cucumbers, peppers, sweet corn and tomatoes.

4 Gardening Lessons for Preschoolers

1. Getting creative

-Get your kids exciting by letting them see what they’ll be planting. By ordering seed catalogs online, you can have children cut out pictures and paste them onto colorful construction paper; when it comes time to plant, you can choose from the selections your child made.

-All of the plants you will be growing need labels, which will provide the perfect chance for little hands to use their art skills as they make plant signs and stakes! It will definitely bring a personal touch to your home garden.

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2. Responsibility through routine

-Plants will have to be watered regularly; giving your child this shared responsibility that the plant depends on to grow will help them to understand routine, a fundamental part of their developmental process. You will have to stress that watering and weeding daily are an important part of gardening.

3. Appreciating the results of hard work

-Children will have to get their muscles working as they break out the child-sized tools to help you with tasks varying from raking soil, pulling weeds, spreading topsoil, to digging holes for seeds to be planted in. When the plants finally do break through the soil to saying hello, kids will appreciate that all of their hard work paid off.

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4. Expanding Horizons

-The great thing about gardening is that it allows children to take part of a process that results in putting healthy food on the table. Even if your little learner is at first resistant to eating their proper portion of veggies, you may find they are less reluctant to try the greener things of life when they know they’ve grown it themselves.

*A lesson in safety: make sure you talk to your children about which plants are edible or not. It is important for them to know that some plants are toxic when ingested and that they shouldn’t eat anything unless they’ve asked you first.

Resources:

-“The Homegrown Preschooler”

-The Preschool Gardening Club

To check out even more resources for starting your own garden, check out our selection here.

 

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