Tag Archives: social emotional learning

5 Books to Get Caught Reading!

10 May

 

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Did you know it is Get Caught Reading Month? In an effort to promote early literacy in young children at home, we have a few of our favorite book selections for you to choose from! Not to mention, fun ideas for places to get caught reading!30706.jpg

1. Henry Helps Book Set (Set of 7):

(2 years & up) Want an engaging way to teach children about household responsibilities? Learning from Henry is a great place to start! This adorable set of 7 paperback books encourages responsibility, teamwork, and helps build self-esteem in small children.

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2. Little Blue Truck: 

(3 years & up) What happens when a little pickup truck faces a muddy country road? Read about the adventures of a little blue truck that gets stuck while pushing a dump truck out of the muck. Filled with truck sounds and animals noises, this board book is a lighthearted journey to the power of friendship and the rewards of helping others.

3. Dan and Jan: 27769.jpg

(4 years & up) Meet Dan and Jan, two friends who love to run, jump, and even dance together! com’s title Dan and Jan is a charming story that will help young readers learn words in the –an word family. A great adventure for young learners to teach early vocabulary.

 

4. Same Old Horse: 

14053.jpg(6 years & up) This lively story encourages kids to work with numbers and make predictions. Beautiful ink-and-watercolor pictures show horses in a barnyard acting just like children on a playground. Notes are included for adults and children about finding patterns and making predictions in everyday life.

 

5. Everything You Need to Know About Frogs:

(7 years & up) Great for science learning, this fascinating hardback book is packed with information about habitats, breeding habits, anatomy, as well as oddities and shocking facts! Explore the world of reptiles and amphibians from all angles with information that is presented through close ups, quizzes, games, and engaging text.

Looking for cool places for kids to nestle up and read? Here are some fun suggestions.

Places to Get Caught Reading:

  • Little nooks under staircases: be sure to include pillows
  • Wide window sills: the natural sunlight is always inspiring for readers
  • Blanket forts: inspire imagination with tiny castles
  • Closet spaces: clean out a corner and plug in a light, a nice little getaway

Tell us how you are promoting early literacy in the household by tagging us on Twitter and using the hashtag #GetCaughtReading.

4 Stress Busters for Little Learners

26 Apr

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Does your child struggle with stress? There are many life stressors, both in the home and in the classroom. As a parent, there are resources and practices you can put into place that will teach young children how to redirect negative emotions into positive self-talk and behavior. Here are some of our favorite tools for redirecting stress into hands-on learning!

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1. Tangle Therapy

 Many times, learning challenges or peers can frustrate children. Tangle Therapy is the perfect tool for relieving stress as children twist textured surfaces into different shapes. It’s a useful aid for redirecting behavior as children exchange negative emotions for complete fascination:

 

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2. Cooperative Board Games

 Competition is another stressor to many young children. Instead of putting precedence on winning, cooperative board games promote cooperative play as children work together to beat the game. Children can work on social–emotional skills while building self-esteem at the same time! Choose from the cooperative board games below:

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3. Sing the Stress Away!

Singing is a creative stress reliever for children. Positive lyrics can reinforce positive self-talk and self-image while helping children develop concentration and memory to be ready to respond to learning opportunities. Learn more about focusing attention on the present moment with the Here, Now Know-How CD: https://www.kaplantoys.com/product/20524/here-now-know-ho-cd

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4. Present a Challenge

Finally, stress can be alleviated in children when they are presented with a different challenge so that focus is shifted away from their current stressor. The Swingy Thing Spinning Game is a hypnotic challenge that gets children’s minds working as they play either alone or together to beat the Swing Thing Spinning Game’s challenges!


What do you do with your children to provide stress relief? Share with us by commenting below!

Toys to Teach Diversity at Home

11 Jan

Diversity: “having different forms, types, ideas” or “having people who are difference races or who have different cultures in a group.”

Sending your child from home to school opens them up to a variety of new ideas, different cultures, and peers of different races. One way to encourage, support, and prepare your child for a transition that instills openness and acceptance of differences in classroom is by using learning resources that teach diversity at home. In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we have a compiled a list of our favorite toys and books to help you promote diversity in your children from an early age:

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 1. Kuddle Dolls 

Especially for visual learners, one of the best ways to teach diversity is through being inclusive in toy selection. These huggable fabric dolls offer a variety of different races to help celebrate diversity!

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 2. Emotiblocks 

Teach children to become familiar with their emotions while instilling tolerance, empathy, and racial diversity. You will have fun asking your children to describe what they see as you discuss different features of the board characters.

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3. Learning to Get Along Book Set (Set of 6)

Many times teaching diversity not only entails recognizing it in the community, but learning social emotional skills to know how to respond to those differences. The Learning to Get Along Book Set presents real-life situations and concrete examples for you to read-aloud and discuss ideas with your children on how to properly respond to each.

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4. International Food Collection 

One fun way to embrace diversity is by integrating it into kitchen play! Teach dramatic play and diversity at the same time with the International Food Collection as you introduce foods from around the world! It’s a great conversation starter about different cultures.

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5. Friends Like Me Differing Abilities Puzzle Set (Set of 4)

 Embracing children with special needs and varying abilities is an important part of acceptance in your child’s peer group. These puzzles are an engaging visual aid for showing real images of children with differing abilities. Use them as the perfect opportunity to discuss diversity with your kids!


We’re curious! How do you talk to your children about discovering diversity in the classroom and community? Let us know by commenting below with learning tools and questions your children ask about diversity.

How to Talk to Your Kids About Bullying

6 Oct

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October is National Bullying Prevention Month. Having conversations in the home with children about bullying can not only prevents potential conflicts in the classroom, but can also prepare your child for being confronted by a bully. Here are five strategies for talking to young children about bullying:

 1. Get to Know Their Social Life

Checking in daily with your child is the best way to know when social dynamics begin to change in a way that could indicate bullying. Encourage your child to talk about their friends, sports teams, and how their classes are going. Your questions are a great way to show that you care while also allowing you to keep track of any environmental changes that may be problematic.

2. Build a Trusting Relationship

Ensure your child knows the lines of communication are always open when it comes to talking to you about what is going on in their life. Even if your child tells you something that is shocking, suspend disbelief to instead let them know you trust what they are telling you.

3. Establish Rules for Online Conduct

Surprisingly, a high percentage of bullying occurs online. With the prevalence of technology at home and in the classroom, it is imperative to establish online conduct rules for children from an early age. This will develop an understanding of responsibility for communications both verbal and virtual. You can encourage your child to keep protected by following these two guidelines:

  1. Never say or do anything online that you wouldn’t say or do in person.
  2. Never share any information that you wouldn’t tell a stranger.

4. Involve Child in Problem Solving Discussion

Work together to come up with a solution so that your child feels empowered. Trying to directly contact the parent of the aggressor can sometimes lead to additional bullying and rarely solves the situation. Instead, take active steps to talk to your child about ways they can bring conflict to an end. Find more resources on standing up to bullies here: http://www.stopbullying.gov/prevention/talking-about-it/

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5. Focus on Social-Emotional Learning

Showing children that everyone is different and speaking openly about the emotions certain actions can evoke is a key part of developing your child’s social emotional skills. Concepts like responsibility, respect, and kindness need to be taught before children can fully understand what a bully is and how to ensure they don’t become one unintentionally.

From books to games, the resources below can help you build social emotional learning in your children as they prepare for interacting with their peers:

Sources:

Things to Consider When Planning a Play Date

26 Aug

 

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It’s the first week of school for many students and parents! As students adapt to the changes of a new teacher and peers, it’s important to support the friendships being fostered in the classroom right from the start. Friendship is not only an essential part of developing a child’s social skills, but it also makes the transition back to school much easier. Interacting and planning play dates with other parents is a great way to support the friendships being made and ensure they will not dwindle away as the school year progresses. Here are six things you’ll want to keep in mind when planning your child’s next play date!

 

  1. Be Prepared —It’s important that your child is ready for the play date regardless of whether they are going or hosting. Make sure he or she is well rested and fed before the allotted time. Not only do you want your child prepared, but you’ll also want to prep the space that you intend to use for play. Choose a space that will allow children to be active as they interact and childproof it for any potential risks. If the play date is happening at your house, your schedule should be cleared for the devoted hour of social time, as children will need consistent supervision.
  1. Know What to Expect—You’ll want to establish who’s picking up who, arrival and departure times, if parents are staying throughout the play date, and how many children will be involved before getting children together. It’s also a good practice to ask about any allergies or medical needs of the children in your care. Once you have all of the details, be sure to talk it over with your child, so they also know when to expect friend-time and how to prepare. (We all know they have that one special toy or outfit they’ll have to find and show off!)
  1. Teach Children How to Play the Perfect Host(ess)—Social skills are one of the many benefits children will gain from interacting with peers and building lasting relationships. One of those skills is courtesy. Explain what it means to be a ‘’good host(ess)” with examples like taking their guest’s jacket and hanging it up, showing their guest the space they’ll be exploring, or even offering a pre-prepared snack or drink! Seeing the guest as someone to be valued will help children better appreciate the ideas of their peers both in and outside of the classroom.
  1. Avoid Threes—There is truth to the concept of “third wheels” and having someone feel “left out” is never ideal. If you can, plan in pairs or keep younger siblings distracted with separate activities so children can interact with their guest.
  1. Know When to Step In—Squabbles are going to happen; it’s natural as kids are unlikely to agree on everything that arises within an hour. There are a couple of ways you can handle play date skirmishes. If there is hitting (or biting) involved, it’s time to step in and change the activity, giving attention to a new subject. If the problem is one that does not involve children being emotionally or physically hurt, it can be just as beneficial to step back and let children work out their own problems. Using communication and understanding differences is a key learning process, and if children can come to joint solutions, problem-solving skills are already underway.
  1. Reflect When Finished—It’s important to know what worked and what didn’t when the play date has come to an end. This will help you with the planning process for the next date and how your child best operates with their peers. Plan your own meeting with the parents of the visiting children so you can both be better prepared for round two!

For the perfect play date toys, you won’t want to miss out on these selections:

Play Date Resources: